If you are convicted of driving under the influence in Colorado, you could face a fine, jail time and license suspension. You may also be put on probation or required to comply with other terms set forth by a judge. It is important to note that DUI laws apply to any substance that could impair your ability to safely operate a motor vehicle.

Many factors can determine your exact sentence

In many cases, failing to submit to chemical testing could result in an automatic loss of driving privileges. This may be true whether or not you’re found guilty of an impaired driving charge. If you are operating a vehicle while impaired and with a child in the car, you could face additional penalties if convicted of the charge. The same could also be true if you cause an accident that results in property damage or bodily injury.

Examples of enhanced DUI penalties

Drivers who have multiple DUI convictions on their record may see a misdemeanor charge automatically upgraded to a felony charge. This could lead to a driver’s license revocation that lasts for up to five years. You might also spend more time in jail or pay a higher fine than you would if convicted of a misdemeanor.

Habitual offenders may lose their vehicles

A habitual offender is generally defined as anyone who has three more more previous convictions for drunk or impaired driving. If you are labeled as a habitual offender, you could be required to give up ownership of your car either temporarily or permanently. Alternatively, a judge may order you to install an ignition interlock device to retain your ability to drive a car. Finally, you might have to attend traffic school or an alcohol rehabilitation program to get your car and license back.

If you have been charged with a DUI, it is important to hire an attorney to help with your case. An attorney may be able to cast doubt on the results of a Breathalyzer test or any other evidence used against you.